The Common Denominator

Haggai 1:5
“Now therefore thus saith the LORD of hosts; Consider your ways.”

A student in school will at some point learn how to find the common denominator in fractions. They learn that there is one number that is common to all the other denominators of a set of fractions. The common denominator may not be evident at first, but once you start seeing the same number come up in every equation, you learn what the common denominator is.

Quite often someone comes to me to get help with their situation or problem. It could be a person who has moved from church to church who has a conflict with their current pastor. It could be a person who seems to have difficulty with other people. It could be a student who seems to have a problem with several teachers. It could be the teacher who has problems with several students. It might be the employee who is having difficulty with his employer or several of his fellow employees. We could go on to identify each relationship, but many relationship problems ultimately come back to one person: the common denominator.

God makes the statement in the verse above, “Consider your ways.” He was talking to a people who continued to place the blame on everything else instead of looking at themselves as the problem. Their finances were drying up, but they blamed it on the economy. They purchased clothing to wear to find that the clothing was faulty. They invested money to find out that the investment was a fraud. These people never saw that the problem was not everything they put the blame upon, but the problem was that they were the common denominator; they were the problem that they had never identified.

Christian, when you continually see that everybody else has issues with you, you might want to look at the common denominator. When you think that your spouse is never treating you right, your children are constantly on your nerves, your pastor is always treating you wrong, and your friends just are not being friendly, you might want to look at the common denominator. You will never fix your problems in life until you come down to who is the common denominator. I’m afraid that we often blame others for the sake of not wanting to identify ourselves as the problem in every relationship. When you tend to have problems getting along with everyone, you might want to look at yourself as the common denominator. When you think everyone is unfriendly with you, you might want to consider that you are the unfriendly common denominator. When you think everyone else is having a bad day, you probably ought to consider that you are the common denominator in the bad day. Simply put; you are the problem.

My friend, you will never change your problems in life until you come to grips with you. Until you are willing to place the blame solely on yourself, you will continue to have problems with others. You have a choice of what you can do. You can blame your problems on everyone else, or you can consider your ways and see that you are the common denominator and change your own ways.

Let me encourage you always to consider yourself the common denominator with every problem before you start blaming others. You will find that you can solve most of your relationship problems and live a happy life if you do this.

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